Archive for August, 2017

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Erasing Symbols, Not History

August 19, 2017

Statues and flags are not history. Only history is history. History exists in many forms and in many places: books, videos, museums, exhibits. Though history goes far beyond the physical manifestations which represent it, some artifacts can be invaluable for the study of past civilizations and cultures. Statues erected after the fact, however, are not the true artifacts of history but merely symbols created with one purpose: to aggrandize.


When Saddam Hussein’s statue came down, it did not erase the history of his reign, not for those he oppressed, not for those who were his cronies. That history remains. However, the statue which honored that leader became a symbol for the defeated regime that had oppressed a significant portion of Iraq’s population, and the reason to publicly honor it or him no longer existed.


This is the flag that signifies the fascist regime of Adolph Hitler. It is no longer flown because that regime has thankfully perished. It too is part of history, one which can be seen in books, videos, museums, and exhibits. Though it no longer has any actual function, it remains a symbol of supposed race superiority and the horrendous application of that despicable philosophy which resulted in the denigration and mistreatment of an entire group of people. It is not a flag that should be displayed publicly for that very reason. The sight of it in that context triggers intense feelings of outrage to all people who recognize what it now represents.

This is the flag that signifies the Confederate States of America that existed during the Civil War. It is no longer flown because that regime has thankfully perished. It too is part of history, one which can be seen in books, videos, museums, and exhibits. Though it no longer has any actual function, it remains a symbol of supposed race superiority and the horrendous application of that despicable philosophy which resulted in the denigration and mistreatment of an entire group of people. It is not a flag that should be displayed publicly for that very reason. The sight of it in that context triggers intense feelings of outrage to all people who recognize what it now represents.

The astute reader will notice that these preceding paragraphs are the same. The parallel is not accidental.

The fact that these two banners are currently used by those hate groups that still cling to the shameful idea of race superiority is an indication of why they should not be part of a public presence. Though statues are not as blatant of a symbol, they still represent ideals that are repugnant to the standards of the nation. Their images belong in books, videos, museums, and exhibits. They do not belong in places of public honor.

I just got back from a trip to the South. One of my stops was at Petersburg, Virginia, site of one of the critical battles of the Civil War. It is now designated as a National Battlefield Park. There are various sculptures and memorials located throughout this park, and that is as it should be, for these are the sites where the events happened, and they should be commemorated in this place. There are memorials to the soldiers and their leaders on both sides. Here, it is fitting and proper.

I also visited Richmond, former capital of the Confederacy, which has a long boulevard called Monument Avenue. Statues of Confederate icons such as Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, and Robert E. Lee can be found here. They serve as a reminder of the old South, one that no longer exists (other than in the minds of a hard-core fringe). Let us not forget that regardless of any other accomplishments, they were the leaders of the fight to perpetuate the abominable institution of slavery, and for that reason should forfeit any public honor.

Removing any remaining public vestiges of the era of slavery should not be an issue any more than removing swastikas and Hitler statues should have been. The only real question is why they were allowed to stand for as long as they did.

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